Buried In Print

Usually reading. When I'm not, I'm likely still thinking about reading. Sometimes planning to read. Making lists of what to read next. Always Buried In Print.

There is a moment in reading a book, not necessarily in the middle, when you shift from having it all depressingly before you to having most of it depressingly behind. You begin to dread the end, the disappearance of everything you’ve come to love. You begin to worry about starting all over again, getting involved in another story. 
Phyllis Rose’s The Shelf (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2014)

"And so, a book is both a physical and a psychical ‘thing’. It has a container and a contained, a weighted physical presence and a weightless drift of ideas. The letters of the text fixed onto the page, ideas and images sailing like kites behind them."
Aislinn Hunter’s Peepshow with Views of the Interior
(Palimpsest Press, 2009)

Always a staleness and lassitude hangs over late summer’s afternoons; returning home at that hour in that season seems an anti-climax; time hangs heavily and a great yawn widens in one’s heart.

—ElizabethTaylor, Wreath of Roses   Review here

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“An overflowing shoe rack in his front hall, underwear hanging from his towel racks in the bathroom, a pile of half-read baby books stacked on his bedside table – she is spreading over all of his stuff, over him, like spores on a week-old loaf of bread.” 

"The Art of Eating"   
Reviewed here

It’s remarkable how many books fall into the category of self-help. Why, for example, do you persist in reading that much-praised, breathtakingly boring foreign novel, slogging through page after page after please-make-it-stop page of tar-slow prose and blush-inducing formal conceit, if not out of an impulse to understand distant lands that because of globalization are increasingly affecting life in your own? What is this impulse of yours, at its core, if not a desire for self-help?Mohsin Hamid’s How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia (2013)

It’s remarkable how many books fall into the category of self-help. Why, for example, do you persist in reading that much-praised, breathtakingly boring foreign novel, slogging through page after page after please-make-it-stop page of tar-slow prose and blush-inducing formal conceit, if not out of an impulse to understand distant lands that because of globalization are increasingly affecting life in your own? What is this impulse of yours, at its core, if not a desire for self-help?
Mohsin Hamid’s How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia (2013)

This is how I spent most of my Canada Day weekend, reading some old and new Canlit faves. A good time had by all. 

This is how I spent most of my Canada Day weekend, reading some old and new Canlit faves. A good time had by all. 

Shari LaPena's Happiness Economics (2011)

Looking forward to the 35th International Festival of Authors 2014

"The Festival’s line-up currently includes over 70 authors writing in genres from literary fiction to thriller to poetry. Expect critically acclaimed Canadian novelists Caroline Adderson, David Bezmozgis, Charles Foran, Steven Galloway, Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer and Michael Winter; Irish heavy hitters Sebastian Barry and Colm Tóibín; crime fiction specialists Jeffery Deaver and James Ellroy; international bestselling novelist Emma Donoghue; talented British author Esther Freud; award-winning South African writer Damon Galgut; the winner of the 2014 Poetry NOW competition, Catherine Graham; actress and debut novelist Anna Hope; Canadian-born French writer Nancy Huston; 2014 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction winner, Eimear McBride; Pulitzer Prize-winning author Marilynne Robinson; celebrated Australian author Christos Tsiolkas; Scottish suspense expert Louise Welsh and many others.”

"Right here, let me say that a writer of books must cultivate the ‘notebook habit’. Keep a blank book; jot down in it every helpful idea that comes your way, every amusing or dramatic incident or expression you hear, every bit of apt description that occurs to you. Be all eye and ear in your daily walks and social intercourse. If you meet a quaint personality write down its salient characteristic. If you see a striking face or feature describe it for future use; if you hear a scrap of native wit or unconscious humor or pathos, preserve it; if you see some exquisite, fleeting effect in sky or sea or field imprison it in words before it can escape you."
Originally published in 1915, “The Way to Make a Book” in Everywoman’s World, included in the first volume of Benjamin Fefebvre’s excellent L.M. Montgomery readers

"Right here, let me say that a writer of books must cultivate the ‘notebook habit’. Keep a blank book; jot down in it every helpful idea that comes your way, every amusing or dramatic incident or expression you hear, every bit of apt description that occurs to you. Be all eye and ear in your daily walks and social intercourse. If you meet a quaint personality write down its salient characteristic. If you see a striking face or feature describe it for future use; if you hear a scrap of native wit or unconscious humor or pathos, preserve it; if you see some exquisite, fleeting effect in sky or sea or field imprison it in words before it can escape you."

Originally published in 1915, “The Way to Make a Book” in Everywoman’s World, included in the first volume of Benjamin Fefebvre’s excellent L.M. Montgomery readers

"The site of his thinking and writing was a small office wedged in one corner of his shaggy house, on whose door he’d installed a lock to keep his sons out. They gathered wistfully outside it, his boys, with their chipped, heartbreaking faces. They were not permitted to so much as knock upon the door to the room in which he thought and wrote about art, but Ted hadn’t found a way to keep them from prowling outside it, ghostly feral creatures drinking from a pond in moonlight…" Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad (2010)

"The site of his thinking and writing was a small office wedged in one corner of his shaggy house, on whose door he’d installed a lock to keep his sons out. They gathered wistfully outside it, his boys, with their chipped, heartbreaking faces. They were not permitted to so much as knock upon the door to the room in which he thought and wrote about art, but Ted hadn’t found a way to keep them from prowling outside it, ghostly feral creatures drinking from a pond in moonlight…" 
Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad (2010)