Buried In Print

Usually reading. When I'm not, I'm likely still thinking about reading. Sometimes planning to read. Making lists of what to read next. Always Buried In Print.
"The site of his thinking and writing was a small office wedged in one corner of his shaggy house, on whose door he’d installed a lock to keep his sons out. They gathered wistfully outside it, his boys, with their chipped, heartbreaking faces. They were not permitted to so much as knock upon the door to the room in which he thought and wrote about art, but Ted hadn’t found a way to keep them from prowling outside it, ghostly feral creatures drinking from a pond in moonlight…" Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad (2010)

"The site of his thinking and writing was a small office wedged in one corner of his shaggy house, on whose door he’d installed a lock to keep his sons out. They gathered wistfully outside it, his boys, with their chipped, heartbreaking faces. They were not permitted to so much as knock upon the door to the room in which he thought and wrote about art, but Ted hadn’t found a way to keep them from prowling outside it, ghostly feral creatures drinking from a pond in moonlight…" 
Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad (2010)

A new reading project: from Scott Westerfeld to Suzanne Sutherland, from Ellen Hopkins to Christopher Paul Curtis. I’m taking kidlit seriously. 

A new reading project: from Scott Westerfeld to Suzanne Sutherland, from Ellen Hopkins to Christopher Paul Curtis. I’m taking kidlit seriously. 

"I read in order to be brave, to learn how to navigate my way through a shape-shifting world. I read for the pure pleasure of how language serves both imagination and will, and to hear the clarity of voices responding to murky reality. In doing so, I discover time and again the ability to find my own."Bernice Eisenstein’s I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors (M&S, 2006) Author’s site here

"I read in order to be brave, to learn how to navigate my way through a shape-shifting world. I read for the pure pleasure of how language serves both imagination and will, and to hear the clarity of voices responding to murky reality. In doing so, I discover time and again the ability to find my own."
Bernice Eisenstein’s I Was a Child of Holocaust Survivors
(M&S, 2006) 
Author’s site here

“I had always been my most comfortable between the stacks. For a while, I was determined to make him love the feeling of cracking the spine of a book as much as I did.”Carrianne Leung’s The Wondrous Woo (Inanna, 2013)
 

I had always been my most comfortable between the stacks. For a while, I was determined to make him love the feeling of cracking the spine of a book as much as I did.”
Carrianne Leung’s The Wondrous Woo (Inanna, 2013)

 

The critical eye never closes for me, but I’m learning to make it look on with disinterest while the reader in me reads.

Ann Cummins, in Alarcón, Daniel, ed. The Secret Miracle: The Novelist’s Handbook. Henry Holt, 2010.

Great collection of short stories by Atlantic Canadian writers: am thoroughly enjoying it. And such a haunting cover image too.

Great collection of short stories by Atlantic Canadian writers: am thoroughly enjoying it. And such a haunting cover image too.

Browsing though an exceptionally tempting stack of Canlit this week. 

Browsing though an exceptionally tempting stack of Canlit this week. 

Georgia once took a creative-writing course, and what the instructor told her was: Too many things. Too many things going on at the same time; also too many people. Think, he told her. What is the important thing? What do you want us to pay attention to? Think.

—Alice Munro’s “Differently” in Friend of My Youth

"Some of the books ended happily, and she read those carefully for clues, but the ones that looked like they were going to end sadly she put down halfway through, even though they seemed more realistic to her."Wayne Grady’s first novel, Emancipation Day (Doubleday - RHC, 2013)

"Some of the books ended happily, and she read those carefully for clues, but the ones that looked like they were going to end sadly she put down halfway through, even though they seemed more realistic to her."
Wayne Grady’s first novel, Emancipation Day (Doubleday - RHC, 2013)